Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Tetawken - Still Chugging Along


Just posting one more shot to show Tetawken's progress! This is after another couple of layers, mostly working on filling in the markings and working on his legs. He still needs one, maybe two more days on his legs and head, probably some more white flecking on his body, mane, tail and other details. We're getting down to the wire, yikes!

Friday, May 22, 2009

Tetawken Progressing


Yet again, another Friday Tip delay. Sorry guys! Tetawken is the culprit; the deadline is coming up fast and I am working on him pretty much non-stop (and going cross eyed to boot). The next hoof tip is about halfway done, so as soon as I get a break from Tetawken, I'll be able to finish it up pretty quickly. Until then, here is a little sneak peek at his progress. His current state is the first picture above; he still needs roaning touchups, legs, markings finished and final details. You can click on his pictures to embiggen!


In this stage, two layers of roaning - one white, one colored - were painted over a blocked in basecoat.


Here, several more layers of roaning have been added as well as some filling in on the markings.

Also, Amy Widman was kind enough to send in a photo of her Simply CM mini stock horse with his winnings. Congrats Amy!

Friday, May 8, 2009

Friday Tip


And we're back on schedule! This week's tip is about painting the bottoms of feet. Whether you choose to paint the bottoms of hooves that are flat on the ground or not is up to you. I always do because the work feels more finished to me, and owners like to admire their horses from all angles! But it does not matter for showing, so use your time how you best see fit. I would suggest however that if you elect not to detail the unseen parts, that you at least paint on a few coats of solid hoof color since most people do not like seeing exposed primer. And now for a quick recap:
  • The colors used are all the same as before, so keep your paint mixes for the bottoms of the hooves.
  • Begin by painting a solid medium to light shade basecoat.
  • Shade in the crevices (much easier on a 3D model than in Photoshop, ha!) and around the wall where it meets the sole.
  • Add in highlighting on the frog and other raised areas, and shade in some subtle striations around the frog.
  • When the hoof is completely shaded, use a very fine brush and a thinned medium-dark brown mix and squiggle in some small faint lines (make them less noticeable than in the video where the contrast is exaggerated)
  • Double check to make sure the outside of the hoof's shading matches with the bottom, and you are done!

Next week, I'll be covering special effects like dirt - stay tuned!

Thursday, May 7, 2009

Friday Tip


The long awaited Friday Tip has arrived! I'm working on the next one right now too, so there should be no delays tomorrow. Whew! This week covers painting hoof stripes. In the video, I do it over a finished shell hoof, but in reality, I always start painting hoof stripes beginning with the first wash of paint to go on the hoof. It makes blending much easier and more realistic for me, but if you find that the paint gets too muddied up, you might try painting the stripes on after the shell color is done. To recap the video:
  • Hoof stripes occur under dark spots on white legs or sometimes on their own, frequently on chestnuts, and especially on appaloosas where it is a color trait.
  • Paint in a basecoat of dark color (I use a mixture of black, burnt umber and white) straight down the hoof. Make sure the stripe follows the angle of the hoof down and does not veer off track!
  • As with the shell (tan) colored hoof, shade in the periople and match up the growth rings. Instead of using various browns for the rings, I use a dark mixture (metallic copper, burnt umber and black), the basecoat color, straight burnt umber, and a suitable periople color (from the shell hoof palette) muted a bit with the grey basecoat color when necessary.
  • When the base growth rings are in place, add in the vertical grain as before, and go back over with horizontal growth rings to set everything in place.
  • Stripes do not always go down all the way or match up perfectly with spots. Use references to paint from for variations.
Next up, painting the bottoms of hooves!

Wednesday, May 6, 2009

Final Color Vote

I still haven't gotten to finishing up the Friday Tip from last week (I'm having some computer problems) but it is on my to-do list. I'll try to post two tips this friday though if it comes to that! Until then, the final color vote for Tetawken is up. His color is down to two choices and the poll ends Friday so I can get to painting him right away! These photos are all just general examples, and the finished paint job is not intended to be a portrait. The thumbnails are provided only as reminders for the choices, and none of these photos are mine - please click on the links to visit each photographers' gallery and to see the full sized photos.

**If you've voted in the final poll on Model Horse Blab already, please do not vote here - I will be tallying the two together.**

Appaloosa 2 Photo by Michelle J.
Features - extended blanket/almost leopard appaloosa, interesting leg and facial markings

Pinto 1 Photo by user sagetopaz
Features - Frame/sabino, interesting combo of roan on the back end and crisper forehand markings

Saturday, May 2, 2009

Tetawken Color Vote


Here is my NAN donation, Tetawken, almost ready for paint! Obviously I still have a lot of prep and cleanup to do, especially on his shoulder, but I wanted to get a quick shot of him up so you can see what's going on. I still can't decide on a color for him, so I have narrowed it down to some choices and created a poll! You can select as many options as you like until Wednesday afternoon, and the top picks will be put up after that for a favorites showdown. These photos are all just general examples, and the finished paint job is not intended to be a portrait. The base color can change on any of them too, but will likely be a bay or chestnut depending on what I think will look best in conjunction with the chosen pattern type. But enough chat, it's time to look at pretty horses and vote! The thumbnails are provided only as reminders for the choices, and none of these photos are mine - please click on the links to visit each photographers' gallery and to see the full sized photos.

Appaloosa 1 Photo by Sarah K. Andrew
Features - Leopard/varnish appaloosa, smallish spots, lots of roaning

Appaloosa 2 Photo by Michelle J.
Features - extended blanket/almost leopard appaloosa, interesting leg and facial markings

Appaloosa 3 Photo by Chris Snyder
Features - varnish appaloosa, lots of uneven roaning, small hip blanket, very few spots

Pinto 1 Photo by user sagetopaz
Features - Frame/sabino, interesting combo of roan on the back end and crisper forehand markings

Pinto 2 Photo by Martina Vannelli
Features - Sabino, irregular patches of roaning and spotting

Pinto 3 Photo by user Saveena
Features - Tobiano?/Sabino, soft roaning

Friday, May 1, 2009

Recent Winnings

Well, I keep messing up on the Friday Tip today, so I am setting it aside until tomorrow. In the meantime, enjoy these pictures from Erin Corbett! She had fabulous outings at the last few shows and sent in some pictures. Her ears forward Jasmine (painted by Tracy Eilers, tack by Erin) swept up the Grand Champ in performance at Northwest Expo and is also now NAN qualified in halter.



Erin also owns four of my Simply CM horses, and here is proof that even though they're simple, they are great showers! The TWH actually had to show in the advanced custom division instead of simple because his feet were changed, and he still managed to hold his own. I also heard that the pinto stock horse got overall reserve champion under the dapple grey warmblood (below)! You can click on their pictures for full galleries (except for the foals whose aren't done yet...).